New online courses from the University of Canterbury's Quake Centre, aimed at improving community earthquake resilience, continue to gain good ground.

 

A GREAT RESPONSE TO NEW QUAKE CENTRE ONLINE INNOVATION

 

"We've had a great response to the online courses that we have available and they've continued to engage a steady flow of registrations," says Quake Centre Director, Dr. Robert Finch.

 

The courses help the industry to clarify how to minimize the seismic damage to non-structural drywall partitions, and how to design for lateral displacements, contributing to the overall resilience of buildings under earthquakes.

 

 

Dr. Finch says, "It's always good to remember that typically 80% of a building is non-structural and non-load bearing, such as drywalll, wall facades, suspended ceiling facades and ventilation, with the remaining 20% of the capital cost of a build being the structural elements."

 

"So the potential economic losses due to earthquake damaged non-structural elements is an important problem and one that needs to be addressed for better seismic performance of buildings."

 

Designed with industry in mind, these online courses address a number of issues. Dr. Ali Sahin Tasligedik, former University of Canterbury Quake Centre Earthquake Research Engineer, oversaw the development.

 

He explains, "We have designed the courses to provide a simple method to help calculate and identify the weak points in structural systems and better performing low damage non-structural elements of multi-storey buildings are before earthquake damage occurs, with the intention of making life easier for structural engineers working in this field.

 

Read more about two of these online courses Hierarchy of Strength HERE & Non-Structural Dry Walls HERE.

 

 

 

 

 


   

 

 

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